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Archive for the ‘Vegetarian’ Category

If harvest season were a novel, this would be the denouement.

For the past few months we’ve had farm-fresh produce delivered right to our door through a CSA with our neighbour’s family farm, and it’s been a fantastic experience. Unpacking the box every Saturday afternoon felt a bit like Christmas: what do we get this week? Raspberries! Baby kale! Golden beets! I’m sure it was just a few weeks ago that the volume and variety of veg in the box reached a fever pitch, but now it’s tapering off, and this week we’ll see our last box.

One thing I have especially enjoyed about the CSA is how seamlessly the season unfolded. First, shoots and greens, then ripe juicy veg, then the hardened and sturdier roots and gourds. Of course, the progression isn’t neat and tidy; along with the last of something you get the first of something else. Like the last of the tomatoes, and the first autumm squash.  This first squash was funny, though – pale, tender flesh like zucchini, skin as tough as an autumn squash. Not quite summer squash, not quite autumn squash.

What to do? Turn on the oven, I thought.

A long slow bake does wonders for both squash and tomatoes, after all. Toss in some leeks, fresh herbs and a generous sprinkle of parmesan cheese, and you’ve got yourself a delightful side dish. Or, with a fried egg and some crusty bread, a divine brunch.

Few better ways to say goodbye to summer’s last veg.

 

Tomato and Squash Gratin
serves 4 as a side dish

1 tbsp. olive oil
2 small leeks, sliced

1 pound summer squash, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 pound ripe tomatoes, cored and cut into 1/4-inch slices
2 tbsp. chopped fresh thyme
1 tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/4 cups grated parmesan
salt and pepper
2 tbsp. olive oil

Heat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cook the leeks: In a medium-sized skillet over medium heat, saute the leeks until soft and lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Spread the leeks evenly in the botton of an oiled square baking dish, and let them cool.

To assemble the gratin, start with sprinkling some of the chopped herbs over the cooked leeks. Starting at one of the baking dish, lay down a row of slightly overlapping tomato slices,propped up slightly at an angle, and sprinkle them with herbs, salt and pepper. Cover the tomatoes with parmesan. Next, arrange a layer of squash slices over the tomatoes and repeat with the seasonings. Repeat with alternating layers of tomatoes and squash, seasoning and covering with cheese, until the pan is full. Sprinkle the whole thing with a healthy pinch of salt and pepper, the remaining herbs and cheese, and drizzle the whole thing with olive oil.

Bake for at least an hour, during which time the juices will bubble and reduce significantly, and the top will be well browned.

Can be made in advance and reheated before serving. This gives the flavours even more chance to get acquainted.

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Earlier this year when I made a whole bunch of changes to my diet, we instituted Tofu Tuesday at my house. I was working on healthier eating, getting more vegetarian protein sources, and eating more grains. In my experience when you’re trying to reinvent how you eat, you need a few standbys to turn to on the nights when you just want something easy, something you can just make without thinking too much about it. Since my husband and I both love tofu, inventing Tofu Tuesday seemed a good place to start.

Tofu Tuesday has a few incarnations, but what you see above is the most common one and we eat it at least once a month.  It’s just brown rice with steamed greens, marinated tofu and peanut sauce, but the sum is so much greater than its parts. It’s hearty, savoury and filling, and as long as you don’t drown it with too much sauce, it feels pretty virtuous.  It’s also a tip of the hat to my favourite dish at Fresh, where I used to eat often way back when it was still called Juice for Life, in its original location in the Annex. That place introduced me to the concept of rice bowls, and for this I am forever grateful.

This peanut sauce is very easy to make, and versatile too. I use it as a dip for fresh spring rolls or as a dressing for cold noodle salads in the summer. It’s also a great go-to for weekday lunches, since it’s usually pretty easy to pack some cooked grains and some vegetables to steam in the microwave at work. Drizzle some of this sauce on it, and suddenly it’s a substantial lunch that won’t have you ransacking your desk for a granola bar an hour later.

Peanut Sauce
Makes about 1 cup

1/3 cup natural peanut butter (smooth or chunky, doesn’t matter)
2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 tbsp. minced garlic
1 tbsp. grated ginger root
1 tbsp. tamari soy sauce
1 tsp. honey
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
hot sauce to taste (I use sriracha)
1/4 cup boiling hot water

In a tall liquid measuring cup, combine all ingredients using an immersion blender. Add the hot water last and blend until the sauce has a nice smooth consistency, adding more water if necessary.

Keeps well for three to five days in the fridge.

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Oh, hello!

Do you have more get-togethers coming up?

Do you have to make something?

Might I suggest these?

Chevre-stuffed mushrooms
makes 30

Do-ahead:  These can be stuffed ahead of time and will keep in the fridge for a day or two before being baked and served.

30 medium-sized cremini or button mushrooms, cleaned and trimmed, with the stems removed and finely chopped
2 tsp. olive oil
1 shallot, diced fine
1 tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary
salt and pepper
EITHER: 1/4 cup fine bread or cracker crumbs, OR 4 extra mushrooms, finely chopped
[This is to accomodate those who can’t eat wheat. Or those who don’t have bread or cracker crumbs.]
1 small log (140 g) soft chevre

1.  In a large saute pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the shallot and cook 2-3 minutes, until softened. Add the rosemary, salt and pepper, and finely chopped mushroom stem (and chopped mushrooms, if not using bread crumbs). Cook until the mushroom is lightly browned and has let off a good deal of moisture – it will have reduced in bulk considerably. If using breadcrumbs, mix them in now, along with about two-thirds of the chevre. Season to taste.

2. Stuff the mushrooms, using your fingers or a small teaspoon to gently pack the stuffing so that it’s level. Top each mushroom with a tiny dab of the leftover chevre, and arrange the mushrooms on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

3. Bake the mushrooms for approximately 20 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit. When the mushrooms are cooked through, turn on the broiler and broil the mushrooms for a few minutes until the tops are attractively browned.

Serve warm.

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Since we’ve moved farther away from our favourite butcher and grocery store where we can buy meat that we feel better about eating (hormone free, free run, etc), I’m thinking about eating less meat. It’s better for us, after all. Health-wise, planet-wise, money-wise, what’s not to like? 

While I’m not a vegetarian, I spent much of my twenties living and sharing food with vegetarians, which meant that I ate veg at home, and meat when I was at work. And while we eat a fair bit of meat here at Last Muffin Standing, I tend to have much more fun cooking vegetables or veg-oriented dishes. Meat is meat any day of the year, but changing your cooking with the seasons is much more interesting. It keeps me in tune with the passage of time. It helps me celebrate the colder weather when I would much rather have the days be longer and brighter.

This recipe came from a desire to eat less meat, but also a craving for something that had the earthy fall flavours of leeks and mushrooms. Also, the combination of creamy pasta, mushrooms and cheese is infinitely appealing as the days get colder and darker. Comfort food, as it were.

America’s Test Kitchen had sent a mushroom lasagna recipe in a recent newsletter, but I found it finicky. I wanted something relatively simple but with a few refined touches. So the bechamel sauce became a white-wine-leek sauce. Next time I make this I might switch up the parmesan for asiago or add some tarragon to the sauce, but this dish is already pretty fabulous on its own. You could halve this recipe to make one small lasagna, but really, why make one when you can make two and freeze one for later? Alternatively, if feeding a crowd, you can make it all in one large baking dish.

Mushroom and leek lasagna
makes 2 8×8 lasagnas*; each serves 4 generously and 6 more virtuously
* I use tin foil pans for for these.

2 pounds cremini mushrooms, sliced
olive oil for sauteeing
salt and pepper to taste
approximately 12 oven-ready dried lasagna noodles [these may look too small to adequately fill the pan, but they will expand as they cook.]
1/4 cup butter
2 medium-sized leeks, washed thoroughly and sliced thin
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup white wine
6 cups whole milk
1 large clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground white pepper
salt to taste
1 cup freshly grated parmesan

1. Working in batches, saute the mushrooms in a large skillet until golden brown and season with salt and pepper as you go. Set the cooked mushrooms aside in a bowl as you get the other ingredients ready. [Tip: if the mushrooms let off moisture as they cool, add those juices into the leek sauce for extra mushroomy flavour. ]

2. In a large saucepan or heavy-bottomed stockpot, melt the butter over medium heat. Saute the leeks until softened, then sprinkle the flour over and mix well to incorporate. Cook the floured leeks a minute or two, then add the white wine. Stirring with a whisk to get rid of any lumps, add the milk and turn down the heat to low. Cook the sauce, whisking occasionally, until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. Add the minced garlic, nutmeg, white pepper and salt.

3. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

4. To assemble the lasagnas, ladle about 1 cup of sauce into the bottom of each baking pan. Set down one layer of noodles and one layer of mushrooms (about 1/4 of the sauteed mushrooms for each pan) and cover with sauce. Repeat with another layer of noodles, the remaining mushrooms, and sauce. Finally, top with one more layer of noodles and sauce to cover, then sprinkle the grated parmesan on top.

5. Bake the lasagnas uncovered for 45 minutes, or until the pasta is cooked through in the centre and the cheese is golden brown on the top. Before serving, let it rest at room temperature for at least 15 minutes. If you want to freeze them, let them cool completely and then wrap in a couple of layers of plastic wrap. To reheat, let it thaw completely and warm it in a low oven (about 325 degrees Fahrenheit) for at least 40 minutes.

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